Road traffic incidents in Uganda: a systematic review study of a five-year trend

Authors

  • Joseph Kimuli Balikuddembe Disaster and Emergency Health Academy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences - International Campus.
  • Ali Ardalan National Institute of Health Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Davoud Khorasani-Zavareh Safety Promotion and Injury Prevention Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran- Iran
  • Amir Nejati Emergency Medicine Research Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Kasiima Stephen Munanura Directorate of Road Traffic and Road Safety, Uganda Police Force, Kampala – Uganda

Keywords:

Systematic review, Traffic crashes, Injury, Trauma, Uganda

Abstract

Background: Over the years, Uganda has been one of the low and middle-income countries bearing the heaviest burden of road traffic incidents (RTI). Since the proclamation of the United Nations Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011 - 2020, a number of measures have been taken to reduce the burden. However, they ought to be premised on existing evidence-based research; therefore, the present review ventures to report the most recent five-year trend of RTI in Uganda.

Methods: Based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Data Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines, a systematic review was employed. Using a thematic analysis, the articles were grouped into: trauma etiology, trauma care, mortality, cost, trauma registry and communication, intervention and treatment for the final analysis.

Results: Of the nineteen articles that were identified to be relevant to the study, the etiology of RTI was inevitably observed to be an important cause of injuries in Uganda. The risk factors cut across: the crash type, injury physiology, cause, victims, setting, age, economic status, and gender. All studies that were reviewed have advanced varying recommendations aimed at responding to the trend of RTIs in Uganda, of which some are in tandem with the five pillars of the United Nations Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011 - 2020.

Conclusion: Peripheral measures of the burden of RTIs in Uganda were undertaken within a five-year timeframe (2011-2015) of implementing the United Nations Decade of Action for Road Safety. The measures however, ought to be scaled-up on robust evidence based research available from all the concerned stakeholders beyond Kampala or central region to other parts of Uganda.

Author Biographies

Joseph Kimuli Balikuddembe, Disaster and Emergency Health Academy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences - International Campus.

Department of Disaster and Emergency Health Academy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences - International Campus

Ali Ardalan, National Institute of Health Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Disaster and Emergency Health Academy, National Institute of Health Research, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran Iran; Harvard Humanitarian  Initiative, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA

Davoud Khorasani-Zavareh, Safety Promotion and Injury Prevention Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran- Iran

Department of Public Health, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran

Amir Nejati, Emergency Medicine Research Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Pre-Hospital Emergency Research

Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. 

Kasiima Stephen Munanura, Directorate of Road Traffic and Road Safety, Uganda Police Force, Kampala – Uganda

a)      Directorate of Traffic Police, Uganda Police Force, Kampala, Uganda

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Published

2016-09-21

Issue

Section

Review Article

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