The relationship between sleep quality and road traffic crashes of urban drivers in Hamadan, Iran

Authors

  • Roya Amini Chronic Diseases (Home care) Research Center, Department of Community Health Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.
  • Forouzan Rezapur-Shahkolai Department of Public Health, School of Public Health & Research Center for Health Sciences, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.
  • Masoud Khodaveisi Chronic Diseases (Home care) Research Center, Department of Community Health Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4635-175X
  • Shirin Gorjian Department of Community Health Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.
  • Ali Reza Soltanian Modeling of Non-communicable Diseases Research Center, Department of Biostatistics, School of Health, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5249/jivr.v12i1.1262

Keywords:

Sleep hygiene, Road traffic trashes, Automobile driving, Cities

Abstract

Background: Sleep quality is one of the main human factors related to urban road traffic crashes. This study aimed at determining the relationship between sleep quality and road traffic crashes in urban drivers.

Methods: This correlational study was conducted in Hamadan, a city located in the western part of Iran. The study samples consisted of 309 Hamadan drivers (i.e., 103 with road traffic crashes (RTCs) and 206 without RTCs), who were referred to police centers to change or renew their driving licenses. The data collection tool was a two-part questionnaire including demographic information and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The questionnaire was filled out in a self-administered manner. Statistical analysis was done using the SPSS-16 software and applying logistic regression, Fisher’s exact test, and Chi-square test.

Results: The comparison of sleep quality scores between two groups, using the adjusted logistic regression test, showed a statistically significant difference between them (P = 0.019). This means that the sleep quality of drivers without RTCs was 1.8 times better than drivers with RTCS (OR=1.8; 95% CI, 1.1 - 3.07).

Conclusions: There was a significant association between poor sleep quality and the occurrence of RTCS in urban drivers. As a result, it is recommended paying more attention to the sleep quality of urban drivers to prevent and control RTCs.

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Published

2019-12-09

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Section

Original Research Article